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Tuesday, October 12, 2021

October 12, 2021: “Soup Bones and Cosmic Gargantuans”

  


 YOUR META WELCOMES YOU TO THE YEAR TWENTY-AUGHT-TWENTY AND ONE!

 


 

Welcome to hope, relevance, relief, self-awareness and SELF-CARE-NESS! We’ve brought you:

 
 

“SOMETHING DIFFERENT: MELANCHOLY IN THE AGE OF KALI”

 

& 

 

“The Cosmic Gargantuan: CreepyPasta Storytime”

 
 
 

AND we’re still serving up music, mindful, and META: ALLLLL the things YOUR BLACK META does with PASSION AND PANACHE!





 
 
 
 
 

—Your Black Meta!


TheBlackMetaWKNY@Gmail.com





 



WORDSofWISDOM&RELEVANCE

 

“In order to understand the world, one has to turn away from it on occasion.”― Albert Camus


“Always go too far, because that's where you'll find the truth”― Albert Camus


“Nobody realizes that some people expend tremendous energy merely to be normal.” ―Albert Camus



 



FreedomWalker’s Sources, Citations, Credits, and Links





COFFEE & GREEN TEA COMBO

  • "The Soup Bone" by Tony Johnston and Illustrator Margot Tomes.
  • TheHoroscope.com - October 13th is Libra- Full Horoscope Personality
  • Good housekeeping/.../best-hand-soaps. "14 Best Hand Soaps To Buy in 2021"
  • CDC.gov/reproductivehealth/infantmortality/maternalandinfanthealth
  • Fatherly.com -"The infant Mortality Rate in the U.S. Explained: What really kills babies.





THE SPRUCE

  • The Spruce
  • Kingston Happenings





K-TOWN NEWS


  • Goodnewsnetwork.org: "Elderly Black Women Celebrate High Court Victory For Equal Property Rights"
  • Reuters.com: "Elderly Black Women in South Africa Win Property Rights in Landmark Ruling"




 
 
 
SOMETHING DIFFERENT: "Melancholy In The Age of Kali"
 
  • Kali: The Dark Mother Goddess in Hinduism: https://www.learnreligions.com/kali-the-dark-mother-1770364
 

 

MINDFUL MUSEUM

  • Completion and final commentary on the book "From Farms to Incubators" by Amy Wu, Award winning journalist and director of the documentary film "From Farms to Incubators"

 

 





beetle's Sources, Citations, Credits, and Links



TUESDAY CAND-AY



  1. PLAYLIST - "The Magnus Archives: Season 1": Rusty Quills Podcast. [40 videos, last updated September 2, 2021.] https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLSbuB1AyaJk-GJV4d3AdvBMJHYiXUEDfI
  2. PLAYLIST - "Lovecraftian Cosmic Horror." Barbati Sanctus, Youtube. [131 videos, last updated Sep 20, 2021] https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgVZYE_OGa2EaQIDhKLdZ8qpGF9z1UQgt





(Re)Sources for Meta on The Meta: “The Magnus Archives: S1 E3 - ‘ACROSS THE STREET’” and Black X-Files: “The Cosmic Gargantuan”




M   U   L   T   I   M   E   D   I   A



"Methodology." Wikipedia.org. Methodology is "'a contextual framework' for research, a coherent and logical scheme based on views, beliefs, and values, that guides the choices researchers [or other users] make". It comprises the theoretical analysis of the body of methods and principles associated with a branch of knowledge such that the methodologies employed from differing disciplines vary depending on their historical development. This creates a continuum of methodologies that stretch across competing understandings of how knowledge and reality are best understood. This situates methodologies within overarching philosophies and approaches. Methodology may be visualized as a spectrum from a predominantly quantitative approach towards a predominantly qualitative approach. Although a methodology may conventionally sit specifically within one of these approaches, researchers may blend approaches in answering their research objectives and so have methodologies that are multimethod and/or interdisciplinary. Overall, a methodology does not set out to provide solutions - it is therefore, not the same as a method. Instead, a methodology offers a theoretical perspective for understanding which method, set of methods, or best practices can be applied to the research question(s) at hand. Last edited September 1, 2021. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methodology





  1. THE MAGNUS ARCHIVES #3 – Across the Street - Horror Narration/Horror Stories." Rusty Quill Podcasts, Youtube. [24:19] March 17, 2017. MAG003 – Case #0070107 – Amy Patel  Statement regarding the alleged disappearance of an acquaintance, Graham Folger  The Magnus Archives tells the tale of how the act of observation may change both the watched and the watcher and an encounter with some disconcerting furniture.  Starring: The Archivist – Jonathan Sims Writer: Jonathan Sims Director / Editor: Alexander J Newall  For more information or to hang out with the Rusty Quill community, visit: WEBSITE: www.rustyquill.com.  The Magnus Archives is distributed by RustyQuill.com and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International Licence. https://youtu.be/vQOiBxvhdb4
  2. '"The Cosmic Gargantuan" | CreepyPasta Storytime.' MrCreepyPasta, Youtube.[15:40] September 15, 2019. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PDy2WuVvhBw


 
 
 
 
 

Articles, Bibliographies, Resources & Websites


  1. "Literary theory and schools of criticism." Ralf Simpson, Slideplayer.com. Presentation on theme: "Literary theory and schools of criticism"— Presentation transcript on site. [30 slides] Last modified two years ago, accessed August 29, 2021. https://slideplayer.com/slide/15165611/
  2. "CRITICAL APPROACHES TO LITERATURE Literary Theory." Marcia Hawkins, Slideplayer.com. Presentation on theme: "CRITICAL APPROACHES TO LITERATURE Literary Theory."— Presentation transcript below slideshow. [22 slides]. Last modified four years ago, accessed August 29, 2021. https://slideplayer.com/slide/11459673/
 
 
 

  • Rustyquill.com
  • https://rustyquill.com/the-magnus-archives/
  • https://archiveofourown.org/tags/The%20Magnus%20Archives%20(Podcast)/works
  • https://the-magnus-archives.fandom.com/wiki/List_of_books
  • https://the-magnus-archives.fandom.com/wiki/The_Magnus_Archives_Wikia
  • https://www.imdb.com/title/tt12429024/
  • https://www.reddit.com/r/TheMagnusArchives/comments/ef5z8z/magnus_archives_book/
  • https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/TheDanza
  • https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Podcast/TheMagnusArchives
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BBC_Sounds
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ben_Drowned
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Fantasy_Awards
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Candle_Cove
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clipping_(computer_graphics)
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copypasta
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creepypasta
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_video_game_terms#God_mode
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horror_podcast
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liminality#Photography_and_internet_culture 
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_creepypastas
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_creepypastas#Jeff_the_Killer  
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_creepypastas#Pale_Luna
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_creepypastas#Slender_Man
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_creepypastas#Smile_Dog
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_creepypastas#The_Backrooms
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_creepypastas#The_Russian_Sleep_Experiment
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_creepypastas#Torture_Soup_(Blank_Room_Soup)
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marble_Hornets
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noclip_mode
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penpal_(novel)
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portmanteau
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slender_Man
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Magnus_Archives
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uncanny
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urban_legend
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usenet




[Referenced / resourced, but not aired]

Multimedia

 
  1. None for this week.
        
 
 
 
 
 

[Referenced / resourced, but not read on-air]

Articles, Bibliographies, Resources & Websites

 

  1. "Cosmic Horror: 15 of the Most CHILLING Titles to Start You Off." Reedsy.com, accessed October 10, 2021. What is cosmic horror? This spine-tingling subgenre is all about the mind-bending terror of the unknown. Knife-wielding slashers might set your heart racing, and a vengeful ghost can make the hair rise on your arm, but cosmic horror is bigger than these tangible fears. It forces you to confront a terrifying suspicion: that you are nothing, in an unfathomable universe full of forces you can’t control. https://reedsy.com/discovery/blog/cosmic-horror
  2. "How to Identify and Write Cosmic Horror Stories." The MasterClass Staff, Mastclass.com. If you find yourself drawn to stories that combine elements of the supernatural with deeper existential inquiry, you might want to look into the works of H.P. Lovecraft and other cosmic horror writers. Cosmic horror can be an incredibly exciting and dynamic genre in which to write. Below is some context and background on cosmic horror and some tips for writing it, should you decide to write a cosmic horror story yourself. Last Updated September 3, 2021. https://www.masterclass.com/articles/how-to-write-cosmic-horror-stories






 





M   U   S   I   C       P   L   A   Y   L   I   S   T   S





FreedomWalker's Playlist:



  1. Misfits: “Dig Up Her Bones
  2. X-Ray Spex: “Melancholy
  3. Malcolm McLaren: “Waltz Darling
     
      





beetle's Playlist:

 


  1. Rusty Quill Podcasts: “THE MAGNUS ARCHIVES #3 – Across the Street - Horror Narration/Horror Stories.”
  2. Kurt Vile: “Pretty Pimpin”
  3. Franz Ferdinand: “40'”
  4. MrCreepyPasta: ‘"The Cosmic Gargantuan" | CreepyPasta Storytime’
  5. Ferraby Lionheart: “Small Planet'”








L   Y   R   I   C   S        S   O   U   R   C   E   (S)

 
 
  • Geniuslyrics.com







T   H   E   B   L   A   C   K   M   E   T   A!



Tuesdays, 1-3 p.m.



Live and streaming at Radiokingston.org


And on 107.FM and 1490AM!

Tuesday, October 5, 2021

October 5, 2021: “‘Mean & Evil’: Welcome to Halloween Month!”

  


 YOUR META WELCOMES YOU TO THE YEAR TWENTY-AUGHT-TWENTY AND ONE!

 


 

Welcome to hope, relevance, relief, self-awareness and SELF-CARE-NESS! We’ve brought you:

 
 

“GET A LOAD OF THESE PUNKS!’”

 

& 

 

“THE MAGNUS ARCHIVES #2 – Do Not Open - Horror Narration/Horror Stories.”

 
 
 

AND we’re still serving up music, mindful, and META: ALLLLL the things YOUR BLACK META does with PASSION AND PANACHE!





 
 
 
 
 

—Your Black Meta!


TheBlackMetaWKNY@Gmail.com





 



WORDSofWISDOM&RELEVANCE

 

“In order to understand the world, one has to turn away from it on occasion.”― Albert Camus


“Always go too far, because that's where you'll find the truth”― Albert Camus


“Nobody realizes that some people expend tremendous energy merely to be normal.” ―Albert Camus



 



FreedomWalker’s Sources, Citations, Credits, and Links



(FREEDOMWALKER says BOO!)




COFFEE & GREEN TEA COMBO

  • Eartha Kitt - "Catwoman's car- Batman."  https://youtu.be/nbPo6zekYxw




THE SPRUCE

  • The Spruce
  • Lesley Gore - "It's My Party" Album facts: https://www.lyrics.com/album/309944/IT'S-MY-PARTY!
  • It's My Party (Lesley Gore Song) - Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It's_my_party(Lesley-Gore-Song)





K-TOWN NEWS


  • Smartlifestyletrends.com
  • "The Best Gadgets of 2021 Will Blow Your Mind"
  • The Daily Freeman
  •  Kingston Happenings
  •  Radio Kingston


 
 
 
SOMETHING DIFFERENT
 
  • NME (The Best Female Fronted Punk Bands) Poly Styrene Singer of X-Ray Spex
  • Polystyrenefilm.net
  • Poly Styrene: "I Am A Cliche"


 





beetle's Sources, Citations, Credits, and Links



TUESDAY CAND-AY



  1. PLAYLIST - The Magnus Archives: Season 1: Rusty Quills Podcast. [40 videos, last updated September 2, 2021.] https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLSbuB1AyaJk-GJV4d3AdvBMJHYiXUEDfI





(Re)Sources for Meta on The Meta: “The Magnus Archives: S1 E2 - ‘DO NOT OPEN’” and Black X-Files: “The Magnus Archives: S1 E1 - ‘Anglerfish’”




M   U   L   T   I   M   E   D   I   A



"Methodology." Wikipedia.org. Methodology is "'a contextual framework' for research, a coherent and logical scheme based on views, beliefs, and values, that guides the choices researchers [or other users] make". It comprises the theoretical analysis of the body of methods and principles associated with a branch of knowledge such that the methodologies employed from differing disciplines vary depending on their historical development. This creates a continuum of methodologies that stretch across competing understandings of how knowledge and reality are best understood. This situates methodologies within overarching philosophies and approaches. Methodology may be visualized as a spectrum from a predominantly quantitative approach towards a predominantly qualitative approach. Although a methodology may conventionally sit specifically within one of these approaches, researchers may blend approaches in answering their research objectives and so have methodologies that are multimethod and/or interdisciplinary. Overall, a methodology does not set out to provide solutions - it is therefore, not the same as a method. Instead, a methodology offers a theoretical perspective for understanding which method, set of methods, or best practices can be applied to the research question(s) at hand. Last edited September 1, 2021. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methodology





  1. THE MAGNUS ARCHIVES #2 – Do Not Open - Horror Narration/Horror Stories." Rusty Quill Podcasts, Youtube. [25:13] MAG002 – Case #9982211 – Joshua Gillespie  Statement regarding time in possession of an apparently empty wooden casket.  The Magnus Archives tells the tale of foolish student promises and we learn the consequences of making a deal with strangers.  Starring: The Archivist – Jonathan Sims Writer: Jonathan Sims Director / Editor : Alexander J Newall  For more information or to hang out with the Rusty Quill community, visit: WEBSITE: www.rustyquill.com. The Magnus Archives is distributed by RustyQuill.com and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International Licence. March 17, 2017. https://youtu.be/vvmC2lq2TLQ
  2. "THE MAGNUS ARCHIVES #1 - Anglerfish - Horror Fiction Podcast." Rusty Quill Podcasts, Youtube. [16:42] MAG001 – Case #0122204 – Nathan Watts Statement regarding an encounter on Old Fishmarket Close, Edinburgh.  The doors of The Magnus Archives open to shine a torch on the files of the Magnus Institute, esteemed research centre for the esoteric and supernatural. Join Head Archivist, Jonathan Sims, as he starts his mammoth organisational task with the tale of a strange entity lurking in the back streets of the Scottish capital…  Starring: The Archivist – Jonathan Sims Writer: Jonathan Sims Director / Editor: Alexander J Newall  For more information or to hang out with the Rusty Quill community, visit: WEBSITE: www.rustyquill.com. The Magnus Archives is distributed by RustyQuill.com and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International Licence. March 17, 2017. https://youtu.be/AdiUHYacaRI


 
 
 
 
 

Articles, Bibliographies, Resources & Websites


  1. "Literary theory and schools of criticism." Ralf Simpson, Slideplayer.com. Presentation on theme: "Literary theory and schools of criticism"— Presentation transcript on site. [30 slides] Last modified two years ago, accessed August 29, 2021. https://slideplayer.com/slide/15165611/
  2. "CRITICAL APPROACHES TO LITERATURE Literary Theory." Marcia Hawkins, Slideplayer.com. Presentation on theme: "CRITICAL APPROACHES TO LITERATURE Literary Theory."— Presentation transcript below slideshow. [22 slides]. Last modified four years ago, accessed August 29, 2021. https://slideplayer.com/slide/11459673/
 
 
 

  • Rustyquill.com
  • https://rustyquill.com/the-magnus-archives/
  • https://archiveofourown.org/tags/The%20Magnus%20Archives%20(Podcast)/works
  • https://the-magnus-archives.fandom.com/wiki/List_of_books
  • https://the-magnus-archives.fandom.com/wiki/The_Magnus_Archives_Wikia
  • https://www.imdb.com/title/tt12429024/
  • https://www.reddit.com/r/TheMagnusArchives/comments/ef5z8z/magnus_archives_book/
  • https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/TheDanza
  • https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Podcast/TheMagnusArchives
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BBC_Sounds
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Fantasy_Awards
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horror_podcast 
  • https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Magnus_Archives




[Referenced / resourced, but not aired]

Multimedia

 
  1. None for this week.
        
 
 
 
 
 

[Referenced / resourced, but not read on-air]

Articles, Bibliographies, Resources & Websites

 

  1. None for this week.






 





M   U   S   I   C       P   L   A   Y   L   I   S   T   S





FreedomWalker's Playlist:



  1. Eartha Kitt: “I Want to be Evil
  2. Lesley Gore: “It's My Party
  3. X-Ray Spex: “Germfree Adolescents
     
      





beetle's Playlist:

 

  1. Rusty Quill Podcasts: “THE MAGNUS ARCHIVES #2 – Do Not Open - Horror Narration/Horror Stories.”
  2. Karen O., Trent Reznor, Atticus Finch: “Immigrant Song” (cover)
  3. Rusty Quill Podcasts: “THE MAGNUS ARCHIVES #1 - Anglerfish - Horror Fiction Podcast”








L   Y   R   I   C   S        S   O   U   R   C   E   (S)

 
 
  • Geniuslyrics.com







T   H   E   B   L   A   C   K   M   E   T   A!



Tuesdays, 1-3 p.m.



Live and streaming at Radiokingston.org


And on 107.FM and 1490AM!

Tuesday, September 28, 2021

September 28, 2021: “... With Friends Like CARIBBEAN GURL ... APRIL H. Returns!”

  


 YOUR META WELCOMES YOU TO THE YEAR TWENTY-AUGHT-TWENTY AND ONE!

 


 

Welcome to hope, relevance, relief, self-awareness and SELF-CARE-NESS! We’ve brought you:


 
 

THE INTERVIEW!

A  P  R  I  L    H.   R  E  T  U  R  N  S!

 
 
 
 

“‘AUTUMN IN (KINGSTON) NEW YORK’”

 

& 

 

“DECONSTRUCTING GODOT: WITH FRIENDS LIKE THESE... .”

 
 
 

AND we’re still serving up music, mindful, and META: ALLLLL the things YOUR BLACK META does with PASSION AND PANACHE!





 
 
 
 
 

—Your Black Meta!


TheBlackMetaWKNY@Gmail.com





 



WORDSofWISDOM&RELEVANCE

 
 
 

 “Nobody realizes that some people expend tremendous energy merely to be normal.” ―Albert Camus

 

“In the midst of winter, I found there was, within me, an invincible summer.  And that makes me happy. For it says that no matter how hard the world pushes against me, within me, there’s something stronger – something better, pushing right back.” ―Albert Camus


  “An intellectual? Yes. And never deny it. An intellectual is someone whose mind watches itself. I like this, because I am happy to be both halves, the watcher and the watched. ‘Can they be brought together?’ This is a practical question. We must get down to it. ‘I despise intelligence’ really means: ‘I cannot bear my doubts.’”― Albert Camus


 “Always go too far, because that's where you'll find the truth”― Albert Camus
 

“In order to understand the world, one has to turn away from it on occasion.”― Albert Camus


 

 



T  H  E         N  T  E  R  V  I  E  W

 

A   P   R   I   L     H.


 
 
Photo from Aprilh.com (https://aprilh.com/?page_id=223). Accessed March 16, 2021.

 

Founder, Caribbean Gurl: Hair and Beauty Products




 
 

 Here you will be able to purchase my organic hair & skin line. Great for reducing eczema flareups. I suffered with eczema starting at age 4 yrs to in my 30s. My 40s I got control and healed from the inside out. I will show you how to heal from the inside. I have The Karen Growth Oil, Indian Sand Hair Poo Oil, Vita C & Green tea ginger toners. Coco Shea Butter, with Lavender Or Medicated. Men Blood orange growth hair beard oil, Brown sugar bodyscrubs that brighrens skin in Ginger or Cinnamon, Sweet Blood orange too. Face Butta, lots of beauty gadgets, Caribbean Gurl T- Shirts and tanks . Custome made jewelry.  Coming soon No later than second week of April.👏  Coming soon. Caribbean Gurl store also Gurl Candie items.

 
 


 

A    B    O    U    T

A      P      R      I      L

H.

 

My name is April Hedge and I'm 49 years old.

 

I was born to two immigrant Multicultural parents. My sister and I also had a music talk show. We did all kinds of music. In 2001 - 2005 I took an indie producing course along with my sister and we got certified in eight weeks. That's how all the producing started. In 2005, I became unemployed for several years and I had to think of something to do, so I went back to doing hair at home. I also made some body scrubs that were made out of salt and other natural oils at the time. It put a few dollars in my pocket and I was glad to come out with body scrubs that were sort of different. My products have been upgraded since then. In 2006, I received a Proclamation Award along with my sister, for producing a makeover shows that help ladies. We gave one lady a makeover. I had one lady named who was overcoming drug addiction. She lived it and has stayed on the right track.

 

In 2015 my first oils were created: Avocado olive and Tahitian coconut.

 

In 2018, my business was registered and launched in 2020. I also went back to fulfilling my dream ... I went back to acting. I auditioned for a Brooklyn web series, called Bad blood Animosity. I worked with the series for one year, and I left in January 2021 to do my own thing. Now, I'll be producing my own web series: Trained to kill But Also love 💘. Coming 2022.

 

I am perfecting my coconut cinnamon bark toner for the face. It has benefiting oils that prevent breakouts. I have not had a breakout of pimples and eczema while using it. Along with FACE BUTTA. I have the Karen Oil. Now, it's time to create more skin care that helps Eczema and burns. Our launch will feature all products at Sample Extravaganza, along with shirts. 



Here’s how it all started:

 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 Aprilh.com | A Blog about Fashion, Culture ,performing arts, beauty, Food Allergy
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

S    O    C    I    A    L        M    E    D    I    A

 
 
 
  • Caribbeangurl.com 
  • Aprilh.com
  • Facebook.com/Caribbeanoilwigwash
  • Etsy.com/shop/CaribbeanGurlByApril
  • Jamaican Descent Gurls on Youtube: Bringing you the best in Jamaican news and fashion too. I'm the creator of Caribbean Gurl Skincare &  Shirts.  My sister owns Feisty Cosmetic... . https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsJe9x2x3iatOQumO-r7cXQ/about
 
 


 




FreedomWalker’s Sources, Citations, Credits, and Links





COFFEE & GREEN TEA COMBO

  • No credits for this segment.







THE SPRUCE

  • The Spruce





K-TOWN NEWS


  •  The Daily Freeman
  •  Kingston Happenings
  •  Radio Kingston


 

 

MINDFUL MUSEUM

  • Commentary on the book "From Farms to Incubators" by Amy Wu . Award winning journalist and director of the documentary film "From Farms to Incubators"

 

 





beetle's Sources, Citations, Credits, and Links



TUESDAY CAND-AY



  1. PLAYLIST: "Tenacious D." Tenacious D, Youtube. [21 Videos, Last updated September 3, 2021] Provided to YouTube by Epic · Tenacious D,  Tenacious D  ℗ 2001. Sony Music Entertainment. Released on: 2001-09-09. Guitar, Vocal, Composer, Lyricist: Jack Black. Vocal, Composer, Lyricist: Kyle Gass. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_my0Y8iaof2_ZaJLCc_4D7w0uLB0qNbgI8





(Re)Sources for “Meta on The Meta: With Friends Like These... .”




"A-." Wiktionary.org. Etymology; From the Ancient Greek ἀ- (a-, “not, without”). Prefix a-; Used to form words indicating a variant spelling of anti-. Last edited August 7, 2021. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/a-#Etymology
 


absurdism
noun
ab·​surd·​ism | \ əb-ˈsər-ˌdi-zəm , -ˈzər- \
Definition of absurdism  : a philosophy based on the belief that the universe is irrational and meaningless and that the search for order brings the individual into conflict with the universe
.

 

"Hermeneutics." Wikipedia.org. Hermeneutics (/ˌhɜːrməˈnjuːtɪks/) is the theory and methodology of interpretation, especially the interpretation of biblical texts, wisdom literature, and philosophical texts. Hermeneutics is more than interpretative principles or methods used when immediate comprehension fails and includes the art of understanding and communication. Modern hermeneutics includes both verbal and non-verbal communication as well as semiotics, presuppositions, and pre-understandings. Hermeneutics has been broadly applied in the humanities, especially in law, history and theology.Hermeneutics was initially applied to the interpretation, or exegesis, of scripture, and has been later broadened to questions of general interpretation. The terms hermeneutics and exegesis are sometimes used interchangeably. Hermeneutics is a wider discipline which includes written, verbal, and non-verbal communication. Exegesis focuses primarily upon the word and grammar of texts. Last edited August 7, 2021. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermeneutics



"Heuristic." Wikipedia.org. A heuristic or heuristic technique (/hjʊəˈrɪstɪk/; Ancient Greek: εὑρίσκω, heurískō, 'I find, discover'), is any approach to problem solving or self-discovery that employs a practical method that is not guaranteed to be optimal, perfect, or rational, but is nevertheless sufficient for reaching an immediate, short-term goal or approximation. Where finding an optimal solution is impossible or impractical, heuristic methods can be used to speed up the process of finding a satisfactory solution. Heuristics can be mental shortcuts that ease the cognitive load of making a decision. Examples that employ heuristics include using trial and error, a rule of thumb or an educated guess. Last edited September 9, 2021. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heuristic 
 
 
Semantics (from Ancient Greek: σημαντικός sēmantikós, "significant") the study of meaning, reference, or truth. The term can be used to refer to subfields of several distinct disciplines, including philosophy, linguistics and computer science. Last edited September 7, 2021. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semantics



Semiotics (also called semiotic studies) is the study of sign processes (semiosis), which are any activity, conduct, or process that involves signs, where a sign is defined as anything that communicates a meaning that is not the sign itself to the sign's interpreter. The meaning can be intentional such as a word uttered with a specific meaning, or unintentional, such as a symptom being a sign of a particular medical condition. Signs can communicate through any of the senses: visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, or gustatory.  The semiotic tradition explores the study of signs and symbols as a significant part of communications. Unlike linguistics, semiotics also studies non-linguistic sign systems. Semiotics includes the study of signs and sign processes, indication, designation, likeness, analogy, allegory, metonymy, metaphor, symbolism, signification, and communication.
Last edited August 30, 2021. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semiotics


"Methodology." Wikipedia.org. Methodology is "'a contextual framework' for research, a coherent and logical scheme based on views, beliefs, and values, that guides the choices researchers [or other users] make". It comprises the theoretical analysis of the body of methods and principles associated with a branch of knowledge such that the methodologies employed from differing disciplines vary depending on their historical development. This creates a continuum of methodologies that stretch across competing understandings of how knowledge and reality are best understood. This situates methodologies within overarching philosophies and approaches. Methodology may be visualized as a spectrum from a predominantly quantitative approach towards a predominantly qualitative approach. Although a methodology may conventionally sit specifically within one of these approaches, researchers may blend approaches in answering their research objectives and so have methodologies that are multimethod and/or interdisciplinary. Overall, a methodology does not set out to provide solutions - it is therefore, not the same as a method. Instead, a methodology offers a theoretical perspective for understanding which method, set of methods, or best practices can be applied to the research question(s) at hand. Last edited September 1, 2021. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methodology




"Literary theory and schools of criticism." Ralf Simpson, Slideplayer.com. Presentation on theme: "Literary theory and schools of criticism"— Presentation transcript on site. [30 slides] Last modified two years ago, accessed August 29, 2021. https://slideplayer.com/slide/15165611/
"CRITICAL APPROACHES TO LITERATURE Literary Theory." Marcia Hawkins, Slideplayer.com. Presentation on theme: "CRITICAL APPROACHES TO LITERATURE Literary Theory."— Presentation transcript below slideshow. [22 slides]. Last modified four years ago, accessed August 29, 2021. https://slideplayer.com/slide/11459673/



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  1. "Inward Singing." Tenacious D, Youtube. [2:13] Provided to YouTube by Epic  Inward Singing · Tenacious D  Tenacious D  ℗ 2001 Sony Music Entertainment  Released on: 2001-09-09  Guitar, Vocal, Composer, Lyricist: Jack Black Vocal, Composer, Lyricist: Kyle Gass. May 2, 2015. https://youtu.be/N3EubVSnq7g
  2. "Kyle Quit the Band." Tenacious D, Youtube. [1:29] Provided to YouTube by Epic Karate Schnitzel · Tenacious D Tenacious D ℗ 2001 Sony Music Entertainment Released on: 2001-09-09 Guitar, Vocal, Composer, Lyricist: Jack Black Vocal, Composer, Lyricist: Kyle Gass. May 2, 2015. https://youtu.be/afYQQXK99OU
  3. "Waiting for Godot: Track 2." Samuel Beckett, audiobook narrated by Sean Barrett. Tracks 2. Produced 2006 and purchased from Libro.fm, August 13, 2021.
  4. "CRITICAL APPROACHES TO LITERATURE Literary Theory." Marcia Hawkins, Slideshow.com. Presentation on theme: "CRITICAL APPROACHES TO LITERATURE Literary Theory."— Presentation transcript below slideshow. [22 slides]. Last modified four years ago, accessed August 29, 2021. https://slideplayer.com/slide/11459673/


 
 
 
 
 

Articles, Bibliographies, Resources & Websites



  1. "Is it worth the trouble?" Ralph Ammer, Ralphammer.com. In 1942 Albert Camus wrote a book called “The Myth of Sisyphus”. It is about the one truly important philosophical problem: Given the circumstances of our existence, shouldn’t we just kill ourselves? This is his answer: Accessed July 12, 2021. https://ralphammer.com/is-it-worth-the-trouble/
  2. "Oxford Reference: Thomas Theorem." Oxfordreference.com, accessed September 14, 2021. A concept formulated by the American sociologist William Isaac Thomas (1863–1967) that ‘“*facts” do not have a uniform existence apart from the persons who observe and interpret them. Rather, the “real” facts are the ways in which different people come into and define situations’. Famously, as he and his research assistant and wife Dorothy Swaine Thomas (1899–1977) put it in 1928, ‘If men define situations as real, they are real in their consequences’. Such a ‘subjective’ definition of the situation by a social actor, group, or subculture is what Merton came to call a self-fulfilling prophecy (as in cases of ‘mind over matter’). It is at the heart of symbolic interactionism. See also constructionism; frame of reference; framing; perspectivism. https://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/oi/authority.20110803104247382 
  3. "Oxford Reference: Self-fulfilling prophecy." Oxfordreference.com. A concept introduced into sociology by Robert Merton (see his Social Theory and Social Structure, 1957), and allied to William Isaac Thomas's earlier and famous theorem that ‘when people define situations as real, they are real in their consequences’. Merton suggests the self-fulfilling prophecy is an important and basic process in society, arguing that ‘in the beginning, a false definition of the situation evokes a new behaviour which makes the originally false conception come true. [It] perpetuates a reign of error’. See also self-destroying prophecy; unintended or unanticipated consequences. Accessed September 14, 2021. https://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/oi/authority.20110803100453294
  4. "Open Education Sociology Dictionary: Thomas theorem." Sociologydictionary.com, accessed September 14, 2021.Definition of Thomas Theorem(noun) The theory that if we define something as real, or believe that something is real, it is real in its consequences. https://sociologydictionary.org/thomas-theorem/
  5. "Literary Theory: Understanding 15 Types of Literary Criticism." MasterClass Staff, Masterclass.com. Literary theory enables readers and critics a better understanding of literature through close readings and contextual insights. What Is Literary Theory?Literary theory is a school of thought or style of literary analysis that gives readers a means to critique the ideas and principles of literature. Another term for literary theory is hermeneutics, which applies to the interpretation of a piece of literature. Literary theory examines a cross section of literature from a specific era, geographic location, or from writers of specific backgrounds or identities to draw conclusions about the similarities and differences in similar kinds of literary works.There are a variety of schools of literary theory, including feminist theory, post-modernist theory, post-structuralist theory, and more. Literary theory helps readers gain a deeper understanding while reading literature by drawing on a critical theory to gain further insight into literary texts. Last updated June 24, 2021. https://www.masterclass.com/articles/literary-theory-explained
  6. "Approaches to Literary Criticism." Salirickandres, Altervista.org. Welcome to our topic Approaches to Literary Criticism! Approaches to Literary Criticism will detail the various approaches to literary criticism that we will utilize to study a literary piece. However, please note that we won’t just be using such approaches to literary criticism in writing our literary analyses essays. We will be using these approaches to literary criticism before even starting reading a literary piece. It is like fitting in a new pair of reading glasses everytime we embark on a reading and writing journey. Hence, we use a specific approach to read, analyze, evaluate, interpret and judge a specific literary piece, and go on to produce a literary analysis essay on that same literary analysis. So, let’s start learning these approaches to literary criticism. Enjoy! Accessed August 29, 2021. https://salirickandres.altervista.org/approaches-literary-criticism/
  7. "Literary Theory." Vince Brewton, Internetencyclopedia.org. “Literary theory” is the body of ideas and methods we use in the practical reading of literature. By literary theory we refer not to the meaning of a work of literature but to the theories that reveal what literature can mean. Literary theory is a description of the underlying principles, one might say the tools, by which we attempt to understand literature. All literary interpretation draws on a basis in theory but can serve as a justification for very different kinds of critical activity. It is literary theory that formulates the relationship between author and work; literary theory develops the significance of race, class, and gender for literary study, both from the standpoint of the biography of the author and an analysis of their thematic presence within texts. Literary theory offers varying approaches for understanding the role of historical context in interpretation as well as the relevance of linguistic and unconscious elements of the text. Literary theorists trace the history and evolution of the different genres—narrative, dramatic, lyric—in addition to the more recent emergence of the novel and the short story, while also investigating the importance of formal elements of literary structure. Lastly, literary theory in recent years has sought to explain the degree to which the text is more the product of a culture than an individual author and in turn how those texts help to create the culture. Accessed August 29, 2021. https://iep.utm.edu/literary/
  8. "Literary Criticism and Theory." Encyclopedia of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender History in America, 1st Edition, Encyclopedia.com. Literature's impact on LGBT people, culture, politics, and history cannot be overestimated. Numerous writers such as Sappho, Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Oscar Wilde, André Gide, Marcel Proust, Hart Crane, Alice Walker, Jeanette Winterson, among many others, tantalize LGBT imaginations. Whether or not these writers "actually" belong to the LGBT "family," the pantheon of "queer" literary icons is important: the language they cultivated rearticulates, challenges, and transforms the worlds of sexual and gender minorities. The scenarios, plots, images, and ideas found in imaginative writing produce possibilities of reading about "queer" characters, actions, and themes, giving audiences opportunities to identify with, enjoy, identify against, and criticize what they discover on the page. And if LGBT plots or figures do not explicitly appear, there are always creative ways to "queer" what is being read. "Made-up" worlds are readily remade and will often yield to the desires of interested readers. Literature can and does provide pleasurable escape from worlds that have not historically valued LGBT lives. At the same time, it can provide alternatives to sexual conventions and gender traditions and can provide new ways to think about culture, society, and politics. August 16, 2021. https://www.encyclopedia.com/social-sciences/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/literary-criticism-and-theory
  9. "The Other, The Big Other, and Othering." Nasrullah Mambrol, Literariness.org. Critical theorists are particularly committed to opposing binary oppositions where one side is seen as privileged over or defining itself against an Other (often capitalized), for example, male/female, Occident/Orient, center/margin. Through such binary oppositions, Homi Bhabha explains, “The Other loses its power to signify, to negate, to initiate its historic desire, to establish its own institutional and oppositional discourse” (1994: 31). Often borrowing maneuvers from deconstruction, critical theorists seek instead to unveil and critique the effort to establish a “sovereign Subject” over and against a constitutive Other. October 24, 2017. https://literariness.org/2017/10/24/the-other-the-big-other-and-othering/
  10. "Queer Theory." Nasrullah Mambrol, Literariness.org. Since the late 1980s, theories of Gender and Sexuality have redefined how we think about culture and society. They have raised new questions about the construction of the gendered and sexualized subject and put forward radical new ideas about PERFORMANCE and PERFORMATIVITY as the means by which the body becomes a SIGNIFYING SYSTEM within SOCIAL FORMATIONS. At the foundation of most theories of Gender and Sexuality is a thoroughgoing critique of the SUBJECT and SUBJECTIVITY. As a social and political category, the subject cuts across all disciplinary and theoretical boundaries. March 4, 2019. https://literariness.org/2019/03/04/queer-theory/
  11. "Queer Theory and Queer Studies." Encyclopedia of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender History in America, 1st Edition. Queer theory emerged during the early 1990s as an effort to think through the politics of sexuality and gender in light of major developments in feminist theory, LGBT studies, and poststructuralism during the previous twenty years. Queer theorists began with the empirical observation that definitions of proper and improper sexual and gender identity have varied significantly over time and space, and that such definitions have played major roles in the politics—the distribution and exercise of power—of Western and non-Western cultures. They then used various heuristic tools from philosophy, literary theory, history, anthropology, and other fields to explore how current definitions came to be and how political action—broadly defined to include activities in social, cultural, and intellectual spheres—might change them. From one perspective, queer theory and queer studies can look very much like LGBT studies, and many people use these designations interchangeably. Both begin with similar empirical observations about chronological and geographic variations in gender and sexuality. But they interpret those observations using distinct conceptual frameworks that can lead to significant disagreement and conflict. Updated August 17, 2021, accessed August 29, 2021. https://www.encyclopedia.com/social-sciences/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/queer-theory-and-queer-studies
  12. "Deconstructive Criticism." Tatiana Tatum-Fisher, Wp.odi.edu. Deconstructive criticism follows the belief that objects have meaning because that it was it has been defined as through language.  Deconstruction uses the concept of binaries in which one object has been given a sort of privilege, the better appeal i.e. good/bad, love/hate, white/black, and  male/female.  In texts these binaries form the motif, or theme of a story. However the theory of deconstruction focuses on how the language of the text may appeal to one binary, but has signs that it favors the opposite, but not necessarily the privileged binary.  Using this concept theorists judge such texts to have “dismantled” themselves. Accessed August 29, 2021. https://sites.wp.odu.edu/tatum-fisherengl333/theory-1/
  13. "Deconstruction." Md Rajibul Hasan, Blogspot.com. Deconstruction is a philosophical movement and theory of literary criticism that questions traditional assumptions about certainty, identity, and truth; asserts that words can only refer to other words; and attempts to demonstrate how statements about any text subvert their own meanings: "In deconstruction, the critic claims there is no meaning to be found in the actual text, but only in the various, often mutually irreconcilable, 'virtual texts' constructed by readers in their search for meaning" (Rebecca Goldstein). April 12, 2010. https://allrfree.blogspot.com/2010/04/deconstruction.html
  14. "Deconstruction." Nasrullah Mambrol, Literariness.org. Deconstruction involves the close reading of texts in order to demonstrate that any given text has irreconcilably contradictory meanings, rather than being a unified, logical whole. As J. Hillis Miller, the preeminent American deconstructionist, has explained in an essay entitled Stevens’ Rock and Criticism as Cure (1976), “Deconstruction is not a dismantling of the structure of a text, but a demonstration that it has already dismantled itself. Its apparently solid ground is no rock but thin air.” March 22, 2016. https://literariness.org/2016/03/22/deconstruction/
  15. "How to Deconstruct a Text." Editors-Authors, Wikihow.com. Deconstruction aims to disturb in order to discover. By deconstructing a text, you learn to read beyond a text's straightforward content and uncover new meanings and truths. Deconstruction has intellectual and political implications. Deconstructing a text is a common assignment given to students of literature, literary theory, film, communications, or postmodernist thought.Whenever deconstruction finds a nutshell—a secure axiom or a pithy maxim—the very idea is to crack it open and disturb this tranquility - John D Caputo. Last updated December 20, 2020. https://www.wikihow.com/Deconstruct-a-Text#References
  16. "How to Deconstruct a Text." Scott Neuffer, Penandthepad.com. Deconstruction is a philosophical movement spearheaded by French thinker Jacques Derrida and other critics during the 1960s. As a literary theory, it focuses on exposing cultural biases in all texts, whether a passage in a popular book or the flashing script of a television ad. Readers engaged in deconstruction analyze words and sentences to identify inherent biases and call into question commonplace interpretations of the text. While this may sound presumptuous or cynical on the front end, deconstruction isn’t about destroying meaning. Rather, it’s about undermining ingrained assumptions to view things in a new light.Oppose Prevailing WisdomThe first thing you’ll have to do is question the common meaning or prevailing theories of the text you're deconstructing. When deconstructing, you need to start from a place of critical opposition. The only assumption you can make is that the meaning of the text is unstable and what others have told you about it is based on their own assumptions. In other words, you need to be skeptical from the onset. If you’re deconstructing Shakespeare’s Sonnet No. 18, which famously begins, “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day,” you can’t assume the poet is talking about a woman or that a woman is inherently an apt object for summery figurative language. What if the speaker of the poem is gay or is being sarcastic about an ex-lover? Unhinge yourself from traditional interpretations and dig into the specifics of the text. Like a scientist on the fringe of discovery, look for evidence to support alternative views.Expose Cultural BiasPractitioners of the deconstructive method refer to cultural biases in texts in a number of lofty ways, calling them "binaries" and "hierarchical oppositions." To understand these interchangeable terms, remember that certain words and the concepts they represent are often privileged, or emphasized more, than their oppposite words and concepts -- rich over poor, male over female, enlightened over ignorant. For instance, if a poet personifies everything in nature -- the sun, the moon, the sea -- as being male, you might conclude that the text has a male bias. If a novelist portrays white European culture as “learned” and “sophisticated” in contrast to other cultures of the world, you might suspect a Western, Euro-centric bias in the text. It’s your job to root out these biases.Analyze Sentence StructureOne way to investigate underlying meaning of a text is to analyze sentence structure, specifically the arrangement of subject and object. Ask yourself if a person or thing represented as an object in the text makes it subordinate to the subject in some way. For instance, if a novel's male protagonist is always the initiator of action rather than the recipient -- “He took her to the store; he bought her earrings; he found some food she would like” -- the recurrent sentence structure may reinforce the protagonist’s power over the dependent character. Look for these patterns and determine if the points of view of other characters are limited to favor cultural bias.Play With Possible MeaningsAfter you’ve analyzed the text for biases, see if your discoveries support a new interpretation. While many associate deconstruction with destruction of meaning, the opposite is true. According to the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy, by assessing the biases of a given text -- the social and historical conventions that helped produce it -- you’ve opened up the words and sentences to an infinite amount of possible, if partial, readings. Returning to Shakespeare’s Sonnet No. 18, the last couplet reads: “So long as men can breathe or eyes can see / So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.” While many have interpreted these lines to convey the eternal power of poetry, the deconstructive reader might find more irony: In his overbearing wish to immortalize his beloved, the poet has betrayed not only the futility of love poetry but the entire chivalric tradition that values youth and beauty over maturity and wisdom. Accessed August 29, 2021. https://penandthepad.com/deconstruct-text-2122472.html
  17. "Elements of Deconstruction: Differance, Dissemination, Destinerrance, And Geocatastrophe." Marie Chris B. Ramoya, Ejournals.ph. This paper attempts to elucidate on Jacques Derrida’s concept of deconstruction and its difficult elements, viz., differance, dissemination, destinerrance, and geocatasthrophe. These basic ideas need elaboration for their proper understanding. Once successfully achieved, then here lies the significance of this paper. Accessed August 29, 2021. https://ejournals.ph/article.php?id=9431
  18. "Waiting for Godot." Sparknotes.com, accessed August 10, 2021. Two men, Vladimir and Estragon, meet near a tree. They converse on various topics and reveal that they are waiting there for a man named Godot. https://www.sparknotes.com/lit/godot/summary/
  19. "The Root's Clapback Mailbag: Same Thing." Michael Harriot, Theroot.com. Each Friday, we clap back at readers' emails, DMs, tweets and messages. We do it because we care. [COMMENTS between users Baldwin'sApprentice and e-the-soc] September 10, 2021. https://www.theroot.com/the-roots-clapback-mailbag-same-thing-1847654083 

 
 
 

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  •     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_World_as_Will_and_Representation
  •     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_theorem 
  •     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tinkerbell_effect
  •     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tragicomedy
  •     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transcendentalism
  •     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transcendental_idealism
  •     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trial_and_error
  •     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Value_judgment
  •     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vladimir_(Waiting_for_Godot)
  •     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waiting_for_Godot
  •     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wisdom#Sapience
  •     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero-sum_game
  •     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero-sum_thinking






[Referenced / resourced, but not aired]

Multimedia

 
  1.     "What Are You Doing With Your Life? The Tail End." Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell, Youtube. [9:35] Gain a new perspective on your life with our "Calendar & Timeline of Your Life Posters": kgs.link/N3Ksfqvp  Sources & further reading: https://sites.google.com/view/sources...  Wrapping your mind around your life is pretty hard, because you are up to your neck in it. It's like trying to understand the ocean while learning how to swim. On most days you are busy just keeping your head above water. So it is not easy to figure out what to do with your life and how to spend your time.  There are a million distractions. Your family, friends and romantic partners, boring work, and exciting projects. Video games to play and books to read. And then there is your couch that somebody needs to lie on. It’s easy to get lost. So let us take a step back and take a look at your life from the outside.   OUR CHANNELS ▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀ German Channel: https://kgs.link/youtubeDE  Spanish Channel: https://kgs.link/youtubeES    HOW CAN YOU SUPPORT US? ▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀▀ This is how we make our living and it would be a pleasure if you support us!  Get Merch designed with ❤ kgs.link/shop   Join the Patreon Bird Army 🐧  https://kgs.link/patreon. May 25, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JXeJANDKwDc
  2.     "Gaze Into the Abyss - Nihilism in Rick and Morty & BoJack Horseman – Wisecrack Edition." Wisecrack, Youtube. [19:35] Welcome to this Wisecrack Edition on Nihilism with Bojack and Rick! Written by: Michael Burns Directed & Narrated by: Jared Bauer Edited by: Mark Potts Motion Graphics by: Drew Levin Produced by: Emily Dunbar  © 2018 Wisecrack, Inc.  January 27, 2018. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PsotfzGpby8
  3.     "The Philosophy of Rick and Morty – Wisecrack Edition." Wisecrack, Youtube. [17:38] Welcome to our special Wisecrack Edition on The Philosophy of Rick and Morty. Get deep-dive insights into the philosophical underpinnings of one of the best shows on television.    Join Wisecrack! SUBSCRIBE! ►► http://bit.ly/1y8Veir Get Access to EXCLUSIVE CONTENT with WisecrackPLUS! ►► http://wscrk.com/WisecrackPlus. December 19, 2015. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hWFDHynfl1E
  4.     "The Philosophy of Get Schwifty (Rick and Morty) – Wisecrack Edition." Wisecrack, Youtube. [8:31] Join Wisecrack! Subscribe! ►►http://bit.ly/1y8Veir  The RICK & MORTY PLAYLIST! ►► http://wscrk.com/WubalubWE Support Wisecrack on PATREON! ►► http://wscrk.com/PatreonWC  Welcome to this special Wisecrack Edition on the Philosophy of Get Schwifty! Join us as we take a closer look at religion and belief systems in one of our favorite episodes of Rick and Morty! Time to Get Schwifty! January 2017. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BxwZWXBwxFU
  5.     "Why Hopelessness Is Hilarious (Rick & Morty, Archer, Gary and His Demons) – Wisecrack Edition." Wisecrack, Youtube. [13:05] You can watch Gary and His Demons by visiting http://vrv.co/wisecrack for your 30-day free trial. Thanks to VRV for supporting this episode!  Subscribe to Wisecrack! ....................... http://wscrk.com/SbscrbWC Exclusive Content on WisecrackPLUS.. http://wscrk.com/YtWcPls  Welcome to this Wisecrack Edition on Gary And His Demons! May 31, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DSc8q1ONH0o
  6.     "Rick and Morty: Is Modern Life Soul-Crushing? – Season 3 Episode 2 Breakdown – Wisecrack Quick Take." Wisecrack, Youtube. [7:45] Check out & Rate the Wisecrack Podcast! iTunes ►► http://wscrk.com/WisecrackPodcast Google Play ►► http://wscrk.com/GPWCPodcast Or wherever you get your Podcasts!  Watch Our Squanchalicious Rick & Morty PLAYLIST ►►http://wscrk.com/RckMrtyplWE SUBSCRIBE! More Rick & Morty Videos Coming! ►► http://wscrk.com/SbscrbWC  To celebrate the launch of Rick and Morty Season 3, we dove in head-first to create a quick breakdown of the latest episode, 'Rickmancing the Stone.' The episode raises fascinating questions about civilization and our modern comforts. Well, we're excited to ponder them with you here. And let us know what you think of the new format! August 3, 2017. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-zw_E4qwuNs
  7.     "What's The Point of Rick's Game? – Rick and Morty Season 3 Episode 4 Breakdown." Wisecrack, Youtube. [9:34] Check out our Rick and Morty Podcast!  ►►  APPLE PODCASTS ► http://wscrk.com/WisecrackPodcast GOOGLE PODCASTS ► http://wscrk.com/GPWCPodcast  In Vindicators 3: The Return of Worldender (S03E04), Rick and Morty lampoons Marvel movies and other huge superhero franchises. But is the show going one step further? Is Rick really a stand-in for villains like The Joker, hellbent on crushing peoples' worldviews and spreading the 'cheer' disillusionment? What, really, is the POINT of Rick's sick game?  === More Rick and Morty! === Philosophy of Rick and Morty ► http://wscrk.com/WubalubWE How Rick and Morty Tell a Story ► http://wscrk.com/RMStryWE Philosophy of SZECHUAN SAUCE ► http://wscrk.com/SzhnScWE Philosophy of GET SCHWIFTY ► http://wscrk.com/GtShwftyWE . August 16, 2017. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=87404S8oOAs
  8.     "Bojack Horseman: "The View from Halfway Down" Poem (S6 EP15)." KEKW LULm Youtube. [1:23] February 2, 2020. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u1_EBSlnDlU
  9.     '"The View from Halfway Down" Explained | Confronting Mortality.' Johnny 2 Cellos, Youtube. [20:15] The View from Halfway Down is one of the most incredible half hours of television I've ever seen. It's easily the best episode of BoJack Horseman Season 6, and arguably of the entire series. In this video I breakdown all of the bits, pieces, callbacks and references that make it so incredible, while analyzing the overall message, and what it means for BoJack Horseman as a character AND as a TV series. February 10, 2020. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9p-1AhQZjPE
  10.     "Optimistic Nihilism." Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell, Youtube. [6:09] The philosophy of Kurzgesagt. July 26, 2017. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MBRqu0YOH14
  11.     'Bojack Horseman: "The View from Halfway Down" Poem (S6 EP15).' KEKW LUL, Youtube. [1:23] February 2, 2020. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u1_EBSlnDlU
  12.     "Chinese Monk Who Saved 8,000 Strays Is Dog's Best Friend." The Damage Report, Youtube. [4:51] Meanwhile in.. China, meet the monk who has saved 8,000 stray dogs. John Iadarola and Jayar Jackson break it down on The Damage Report. Read more here: https://www.france24.com/en/live-news/20210622-chinese-monk-who-saved-8-000-strays-is-dog-s-best-friend. "His bald head glistening with sweat, Zhi Xiang peers into the eyes of a stray dog whose coat has become matted in heavy rain and says soothingly: "Let me cut your hair, cutie."  The bedraggled pooch is among scores of dogs hauled off the streets of Shanghai by police and packed in metal cages in a foul-smelling holding area.  More than 20 puppies are also crammed into a yellow plastic crate; one dog is dragged in while inside a tied bag.  But for Zhi's intervention, they will all be put down in a matter of days.  But Zhi is no ordinary animal rescuer: he is a Buddhist monk and will give these dogs a new life either at his ancient monastery or at a shelter he runs in the Chinese city.  He already has nearly 8,000 dogs to feed and care for. A few hundred will eventually be resettled in Europe or North America." June 26, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DqRv2WTYoZ8
  13.     "Why Are You Alive – Life, Energy & ATP." Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell, Youtube. [11:30] Sources & further reading:  https://sites.google.com/view/sources...  At this very second, you are on a narrow ledge between life and death. You probably don’t feel  it, but there is an incredible amount of activity going on inside you. And this activity can never stop.  Picture  yourself as a slinky falling down an escalator moving upwards – the falling part represents the self replicating processes of your cells, the escalator represents  the laws of physics, driving you forwards. To be alive is to be in motion but never arriving anywhere. If you reach the top of the escalator there is no more falling possible and you are dead forever.   Somewhat unsettlingly, the universe wants you to reach the top. How do you avoid that and why are you alive? May 10, 2020. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QImCld9YubE
  14.     "The Origin of Consciousness – How Unaware Things Became Aware." Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell, Youtube. [9:40] Sources and link to book by Rupert Glasgow: https://sites.google.com/view/sources...  Consciousness is perhaps the biggest riddle in nature. In the first part of this three part video series, we explore the origins of consciousness and take a closer look on how unaware things became aware.  This video was made possible by a grant from the Templeton World Charity Foundation. March 17, 2019. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H6u0VBqNBQ8
  15.     "What Is Intelligence? Where Does it Begin?" Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell, Youtube. [9:45] This video was made possible by a grant from the Templeton World Charity Foundation.  Sources & further reading: https://sites.google.com/view/sources...  Humans are proud of a lot of things, from particle accelerators, to  poetry to pokemon. All of them made possible because of something humans value extremely highly: intelligence. July 12, 2020. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ck4RGeoHFko&t
  16.     "Emergence – How Stupid Things Become Smart Together." Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell, Youtube. [7:30] How can many stupid things combine to form smart things? How can proteins become living cells? How become lots of ants a colony? What is emergence?  This video was made possible by a donation by the Templeton World Charity Foundation. A huge thanks to them for their support and help over the last year! November 16, 2017. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16W7c0mb-rE
  17.     "Is Reality Real? The Simulation Argument." Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell, Youtube. [8:45] Watch Part 2 on Vsauce 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3d9i_0Ty7Cg. September 21, 2017. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tlTKTTt47WE
  18.     "Are You In A Simulation?" Vsauce3, Youtube. [7:12] Watch Part 2 on Kurzgesagt: https://youtu.be/tlTKTTt47WE  instagram: http://instagr.am/jakerawr twitter: http://twitter.com/vsaucethree facebook: http://facebook.com/vsauce3  Nick Bostrom's Simulation Argument https://www.simulation-argument.com/s...  Solipsism and the Problem of Other Minds http://www.iep.utm.edu/solipsis/  Age of Empires 2 footage: https://youtu.be/lSvaKtWzJ_g  Civ 6 Footage: https://youtu.be/dBx0KBsI0Jc  Elon Musk on Simulation Theory: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GZgBc...  Neil deGrasse Tyson: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SYAG9...  Interesting TED talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Chfoo...  Building Imaginary Worlds: https://www.amazon.com/Building-Imagi...  **CREDITS**  Written, directed, hosted, and edited by Jake Roper  Cinematography and VFX by Eric Langlay https://www.youtube.com/ericlanglay  Sound design by Jay Pellizzi http://jaypellizzi.com/  **VSAUCE**  Vsauce1: http://youtube.com/vsauce1 Vsauce2: http://youtube.com/vsauce2 DONG: http://youtube.com/DONG Curiosity Box: curiositybox.com. September 21, 2017. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3d9i_0Ty7Cg
  19.     "Why Beautiful Things Make us Happy – Beauty Explained." Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell, Youtube. [7:36] It’s hard to define what makes something beautiful, but we seem to know beauty when we see it. Why is that and how does beauty affect our subconscious?  This video was a collaboration with the creative agency Sagmeister & Walsh as a contribution to their upcoming Beauty exhibition at the MAK Vienna from October 23rd onwards. If you want to learn more about the impact of beauty and see tons of gorgeous installations and multi-media objects, go check it out on https://www.mak.at/en_sagmeister_walsh The Beauty exhibition will also be shown in the Museum Angewandte Kunst Frankfurt from May 11th till September 15th.  Sources: https://sites.google.com/view/kgssourcesbeauty/startseite. October 23, 2018. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-O5kNPlUV7w
  20.     "Why Does Rick Need Toxic Rick? – Rick and Morty Season 3 Episode 6 Breakdown – Wisecrack Quick Take." Wisecrack, Youtube. [7:19] Listen To & Rate Our New Rick & Morty PODCAST on iTunes ►► http://wscrk.com/WisecrackPodcast Or Google Play ►► http://wscrk.com/GPWCPodcast Watch Our Quick Take on VINDICATORS 3 (S03E04) ►► http://wscrk.com/RMS3E4 SUBSCRIBE! More Rick & Morty Videos Coming! ►► http://wscrk.com/SbscrbWC  Is Rick and Morty's detoxification part of a larger criticism of the self-help industry? Join us as we explore Morty's descent into madness in Rest and Ricklaxation. August 31, 2017. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IPAqPA5WF8w
  21.     "The myth of Sisyphus - Alex Gendler." TED-Ed, Youtube. [4:56] Sisyphus was both a clever ruler who made his city prosperous, and a devious tyrant who seduced his niece and killed visitors to show off his power. While his violation of the sacred hospitality tradition greatly angered the gods, it was Sisyphus’ reckless confidence that proved to be his downfall -- resulting in Zeus condemning him for all eternity. Alex Gendler shares the myth of Sisyphus.   Lesson by Alex Gendler, directed by Adriatic Animation. November 13, 2018. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q4pDUxth5fQ
  22.     "The Myth of Sisyphus | Albert Camus." Eternalised, Youtube. [10:00] The Myth of Sisyphus is a philosophical essay by Albert Camus and is considered as one of the most popular existentialist works of the 20th century. It gave rise to the philosophy of Absurdism, sharing some concepts with Existentialism and Nihilism.  The fundamental concern of the book is the notion of the Absurd, which is best described as “the conflict between the human tendency to seek inherent value and meaning in life, and the human inability to find any in a purposeless, meaningless, and irrational universe.”   Camus draws from the absurd three consequences: revolt (we must not accept any answer or reconciliation in our struggle), freedom (we are absolutely free to think and behave as we choose), and passion (we must pursue a life of rich and diverse experiences).  The Myth of Sisyphus explores the value of life in a world devoid of religious meaning. His work can be seen as a reply to Dostoevsky and Kierkegaard.  December 11, 2020. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IKk4WEs3SyQ
  23.     "7 Life Lessons From Albert Camus (Philosophy of Absurdism)." Philosophies for Life, Youtube. [20:56] In this video we will be talking about 7 Life Lessons From Albert Camus. Albert Camus is one of the most representative figures of the philosophy of the “absurd” or “absurdism,” and his philosophy has inspired a lot of  people in dealing with the absurdity of life.   So with that in mind, here are 7 important lessons that we can learn from Albert Camus -  01. Create your own meaning for life 02. Don’t make happiness a distant goal 03. Don’t be ignorant 04. Be a rebel 05. Spend time with yourself 06. Be flexible 07. Choose Love  I hope you enjoyed watching the video and hope these 7 Life Lessons From Albert Camus will add value to your life.   Albert Camus is one of the greatest French writers and thinkers. He was a philosopher, an author and a journalist. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1957 and his most famous works are The Stranger, The Plague, The Myth of Sisyphus, The Fall, and The Rebel. Camus is one of the most representative figures of the philosophy of the “absurd” or “absurdism,” which is a philosophical movement having as its central hypothesis that human beings exist in a purposeless, chaotic universe. Camus considered that absolute freedom must be balanced with absolute justice - too much freedom leads to the situation when the strong suppresses the weak but too much justice kills freedom, and we need to live and let live. As a promoter of the philosophy of the “absurd”, Camus believed that life has no meaning, that the universe simply exists and that it is indifferent to people’s lives. We are like Sisyphus from Greek mythology, forever carrying that heavy rock to the top of the hill, although we know the rock will always fall down and our life's work is meaningless. Our condition might be tragic, but Camus considered that this exact condition hides a blessing in disguise: life does not have a meaning, but we are free to attribute it any meaning we want. His philosophy has inspired a lot of  people in dealing with the absurdity of life and even today, his philosophy is extremely relevant. May 28, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Idhb8OVDCM
  24.     'Albert Camus The Myth of Sisyphus - Is "Absurd Freedom" Completely Absurd?' The Philosophical Life, Youtube. [28:27] ALBERT CAMUS THE MYTH OF SISYPHUS – IS “ABSURD FREEDOM” COMPLETELY ABSURD? // In this video, you’ll gain a deeper understanding of Albert Camus’ “The Myth of Sisyphus.” This will help you think critically about a nihilistic approach to the meaning of life.  Consider Sisyphus, condemned by the gods to roll a stone up a hill, only to have the stone fall back down to the bottom again. Endless pointless activity is his punishment for betraying the gods. But, Sisyphus persists. He continues the cycle. Why? Why doesn’t Sisyphus kill himself?  Camus thinks Sisyphus knowingly and willingly embraces his fate. This must occur in the moments of awareness Sisyphus is afforded as he returns down the hill to pick up his stone again. As Camus famously says, “All Sisyphus’ silent joy is contained therein. His fate belongs to him. His rock is his thing….One must imagine Sisyphus happy.”  What’s the analogy? What makes our life worth living given the absurdity of life? The stone is all of life’s burdens. We try to roll our stone up the hill, only to have that stone come tumbling down, only to have more burdens to hoist up the hill again.  When we inevitably die we leave our stone to the next generation. They now hoist it up the hill. This passing of burdens continues. But all the stone rolling will stop someday.  As the sun expands and the earth becomes too hot to support life, human stone rolling will cease. What was the point of all that activity? Didn’t it amount to nothing in the end?  There is no point. And the sooner we embrace this fate we become, like Sisyphus, an absurd  person. We keep rolling our stone. In doing so, we take ownership of our fate. Our stone becomes *our* thing, not a thing we’re hopelessly saddled with by a cold and uncaring universe. We find happiness despite life having no meaning.  Is Camus take on the myth of Sisyphus comforting to you? Or do you think his premise about life’ being without meaning is unfounded? Do you think the universe offers clues to the meaning of life? Where is such meaning found?  Leave your thoughts in the comments and hit the like button if you found this video helpful. October 19, 2019. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k1nCoi1hliY
  25.     "Absurdism - (Albert Camus)." Philosophy Vibe, Youtube. [15:07] Join George and John as they discuss and debate different Philosophical ideas, today they will be focusing on the theory of Absurdism.  Put forward by the writer Albert Camus, Absurdism is a position that explains the human experience and the absurdity that comes with it. Camus claimed that human beings have an innate desire to find purpose and meaning to life, however we ultimately live in a meaningless Universe. How should deal with the absurd realisation? Camus explains his version of the Absurd Man, the ideal that human beings should strive to be.  Watch as George and John explain this position and critically assess Absurdism as a Philosophical thought.  The Script to this video is part of the Philosophy Vibe “Existentialism” eBook, available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B088QQBXY3. November 18, 2020. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sR3sK_aNJ-k
  26.     "Camus's Myth of Sisyphus | A History of Philosophy." Intellectgrime, Youtube. [18:27] Ever wondered what "absurdism" is, and how it differs from existentialism? Do you want to know who Albert Camus was and why he was so famous? In this video I share a simplified account of the philosophy of Camus in his book The Myth of Sisyphus, covering the main points of the text. But it doesn't stop there, let's keep the discussion going in the comments!   Post-script:   I hope you enjoyed the video! I realize now (after the video has already taken multiple hours to upload) that I've misrepresented/ neglected to mention a crucial point of the text which is essentially the point on freedom. ٍِRebellion for Camus entails the freedom to establish a new mindset about the futility of life, as one of unique and valuable existence, (p. 52-55, 63), contradicting my point that "rebellion is our only choice" or that the reasoning is simply "rebel because why not". However, I phrased it that way in the video because I am personally not convinced of this definition of freedom. In my reading of Camus, "rebellion" is not a condition of freedom but one of necessity; if life is absurd and we don't want to avoid it entirely by ending our life, then it's really our only option to keep going. Calling that "rebellion" or absurd freedom is just a turn of phrase that sounds good, especially in the French. If you're interested in reading about different notions of freedom though not necessarily in relation to French philosophy there's a great article by Isiah Berlin called Two Concepts of Liberty I would recommend. If you're interested in reading more about the role of rhetoric and myth in philosophy, I would recommend you read articles written by Grace Whistler. Links to these further readings in the description.   References: Albert Camus. The Myth of Sisyphus. (2005). Translated from French by Justin O'Brien. Penguin Great Ideas. London: UK.   Further reading: Berlin's article on liberty: http://cactus.dixie.edu/green/B_Readi... Grace Whistler's article on myth in Camus: https://www.academia.edu/37098792/Mut... More articles by Grace Whistler on Philosophy and Literature: https://york.academia.edu/GraceWhistler June 16, 2019. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GlYMpX4hRhE
  27.     "What Are You?" Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell, Youtube. [6:27] What Are You?  So. Are you your body? And if so, how exactly does this work? Lets explore lots of confusing questions.   This video is part of a collaboration with CGPGrey. Check out his video here: http://bit.ly/1sphjx2. May 31, 2016. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JQVmkDUkZT4
  28.     "A Selfish Argument for Making the World a Better Place – Egoistic Altruism."  Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell, Youtube. [7:14] Why should you care about the well-being of people half a globe away? March 18, 2018. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rvskMHn0sqQ
  29.     "The Philosophy of ONE PUNCH MAN – Wisecrack Edition." Wisecrack, Youtube. [15:27] Join Wisecrack! Subscribe! ►► http://wscrk.com/SbscrbWC Support Wisecrack on Patreon! ►► http://wscrk.com/PtrnWC  One Punch Man's Saitama isn't your typical hero. He doesn't struggle to defeat villains so much as he struggles to show up to the fight on time. What can Saitama and his bored lifestyle teach us about our own modern lifestyle? And what secrets lie in the show's storytelling? Join us in this Wisecrack Edition on the Philosophy of One Punch Man. May 27, 2017. https://youtu.be/EQB6ctBXNzs
  30.     "Albert Camus ✏️ - The Myth of Sisyphus ( How To Face The Absurdity of life)." Puzzling Life, Youtube. [8:56] In his book The Myth of Sisyphus: Albert Camus started by an existential affirmation “There is only one really serious philosophical question, and that is suicide”  And this will be the base of today’s video, welcome back to puzzling life where we take a look at life's biggest questions : today’s puzzle is : what are we in the face of the absurdity of life ?  How can we view the absurdity of life, and how to live in the face of it? May 1, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nx73fT0oVrs
  31.     "Rick and Morty: The Philosophy of Szechuan Sauce – Wisecrack Edition." Wisecrack, Youtube. [9:56] Join Wisecrack! Subscribe! ►► http://bit.ly/1y8Veir Support Wisecrack on Patreon! ►► http://wscrk.com/PtrnWC  Check out More Rick and Morty Videos! Philosophy of Rick and Morty ► http://wscrk.com/WubalubWE References in Rick and Morty ► http://wscrk.com/RfRckMrtyWE Philosophy of Get Schwifty ► http://wscrk.com/GtShwftyWE  Welcome to this Wisecrack Edition on Rick and Morty Seaon 3:  The Philosophy of Szechuan Sauce. Join us as we dive in to Camus and Dostoevsky in order to gain deeper insight in to Rick's journey for that teriyaki dipping sauce. That's what this entire episode is about, Wisecrack- that Mulan Mcnugget Sauce. It's our rosebud; our one armed man. It's what drives us.  Huge thanks to LAZERHAWK for providing the music in this episode! Check 'em out!  ►► http://lazerhawk.bandcamp.com/. April 15, 2017. https://youtu.be/LXsj_7n4aWY
  32.     "A GUIDE TO ABSURDISM: The Philosophy For Living Fully." Sisyphus 55, Youtube. [7:33] Source: https://ralphammer.com/is-it-worth-the-trouble/. January 23, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KC1YrxJma8&t
  33.     "7 Life Lessons from Arthur Schopenhauer (The Philosophy of Pessimism)." Philosophy of Life, Youtube. [21:22] In this video we will be talking about 7 Life Lessons From Arthur Schopenhauer. Arthur Schopenhauer is considered to be one of the greatest philosophers and his work is part of the philosophy of pessimism. He is mostly known for his famous book “The World as Will and Representation”.  So here are 7 Life Lessons From Arthur Schopenhauer -  01. Find yourself in solitude 02. Remove suffering to be happy 03. Understand your subconscious mind 04. Limit your expectations 05. Be compassionate 06. Avoid boredom 07. Make room for art   I hope you enjoyed watching the video and hope these 7 life lessons from Arthur Schopenhauer will add value to your life.    Arthur Schopenhauer is considered to be one of the greatest philosophers of all time. He lived from the end of the 18th to the beginning of the 19th century and while he is often described as a genius philosopher, he has also been given less flattering monikers such as The Sad Prince of pessimism and The Messenger of Misery, due to his particularly unique philosophical views . He influenced the work of many great thinkers after him, from philosophers to psychologists to physicists. Arthur Schopenhauer’s work is part of the philosophy of pessimism and Schopenhauer is mostly known for his famous book “The World as Will and Representation”, in which he describes the physical world as the manifestation of an invisible force, a metaphysical will. Schopenhauer's philosophy is based on the idea that the world we perceive is not the real world, we see reality through our own personal filters, which Indian philosophy calls "the veils of Maya" that prevent us from seeing “actual reality”. Schopenhauer is one of the philosophers who pondered the most on subjects such as loneliness, solitude, boredom and what true happiness means. February 16, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cyq02jZV0g
  34.     "Life is Absurd. How to Live it? [The Philosophy of Albert Camus]." Einzelgänger, Youtube. [10:43] French-Algerian philosopher Albert Camus believed that life has no inherent meaning and is, therefore, absurd.  Cuts, voice, footage, script by Einzelgänger. I also used Creative Commons, licensed material from Storyblocks & Pixabay (links available upon request). April 16, 2020. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_hJZEq61KeM
  35.     "What If The World is Actually a Prison? | The Philosophy of Arthur Schopenhauer." Einzelgänger , Youtube. [11:19] What if this world is actually one giant prison? When the 19th-century philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer observed the amount of pain that we experience during our lifetimes, he concluded that it’s not happiness and pleasure we’re after, but a reduction of the ongoing suffering that’s an inherent part of existence.  When we remove the veil of ignorance and behold the harsh reality we live in, we might start to question, as Schopenhauer does, the idea that, I quote, "this world is the successful work of an all-wise, all-good, and, at the same time, all-powerful Being." End quote. For Schopenhauer's view of the world is one of agony — devoid of divine grace — and it has much more in common with a “penal colony” than with the creation of a benevolent deity. Now, seeing the world as a prison sounds like a recipe for personal misery. Why not adopt a more positive, more hopeful perspective? Why look at it with such pessimism?  Well, Schopenhauer’s idea comes with a twist. Within his pessimistic worldview lies an outlook that could be very beneficial to humanity. Based on his essay On the Sufferings of the World, this video explores Schopenhauer’s pessimistic outlook on life and reveals a secret to be gained from it. May 6, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0NBrce-ZHi0
  36.     "7 Life Lessons from Arthur Schopenhauer (The Philosophy of Pessimism)." Philosophy of Life, Youtube. [21:22] In this video we will be talking about 7 Life Lessons From Arthur Schopenhauer. Arthur Schopenhauer is considered to be one of the greatest philosophers and his work is part of the philosophy of pessimism. He is mostly known for his famous book “The World as Will and Representation”.  So here are 7 Life Lessons From Arthur Schopenhauer -  01. Find yourself in solitude 02. Remove suffering to be happy 03. Understand your subconscious mind 04. Limit your expectations 05. Be compassionate 06. Avoid boredom 07. Make room for art   I hope you enjoyed watching the video and hope these 7 life lessons from Arthur Schopenhauer will add value to your life.    Arthur Schopenhauer is considered to be one of the greatest philosophers of all time. He lived from the end of the 18th to the beginning of the 19th century and while he is often described as a genius philosopher, he has also been given less flattering monikers such as The Sad Prince of pessimism and The Messenger of Misery, due to his particularly unique philosophical views . He influenced the work of many great thinkers after him, from philosophers to psychologists to physicists. Arthur Schopenhauer’s work is part of the philosophy of pessimism and Schopenhauer is mostly known for his famous book “The World as Will and Representation”, in which he describes the physical world as the manifestation of an invisible force, a metaphysical will. Schopenhauer's philosophy is based on the idea that the world we perceive is not the real world, we see reality through our own personal filters, which Indian philosophy calls "the veils of Maya" that prevent us from seeing “actual reality”. Schopenhauer is one of the philosophers who pondered the most on subjects such as loneliness, solitude, boredom and what true happiness means. February 16, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cyq02jZV0g
  37.     "Tom's Language Files." Tom Scott, Youtube. [30 videos] Videos about linguistics, languages, and love. But mainly linguistics. Last Updated March 29, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL96C35uN7xGLDEnHuhD7CTZES3KXFnwm0
  38.     "The Language Sounds That Could Exist, But Don't." Tom Scott, Youtube. [6:30] The International Phonetic Alphabet: one sound for each symbol, and one symbol for each sound. Except for the sounds we can't make. Pull down the description for the references! MORE LANGUAGE FILES: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL96C35uN7xGLDEnHuhD7CTZES3KXFnwm0. September 2, 2019. https://youtu.be/9uZam0ubq-Y
  39.     "The Sentences Computers Can't Understand, But Humans Can." Tom Scott, Youtube. [4:41] The Winograd schema is a language test for intelligent computers. So far, they're not doing well. MORE LANGUAGE FILES: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...   Written with Gretchen McCulloch and Molly Ruhl. Gretchen's podcast Lingthusiasm is at http://lingthusiasm.com/ - and Gretchen's new book, BECAUSE INTERNET, is available:  🇺🇸 US: https://amzn.to/30tLpjT 🇨🇦 CA: https://amzn.to/2JsTYWH 🇬🇧 UK: https://amzn.to/31K8eRD  (Those are affiliate links that give a commission to me or Gretchen, depending on country!)  REFERENCES:  Levesque, H.J., Davis, E., and Morgenstern, L. (2011). The winograd schema challenge. In AAAI Spring Symposium: Logical Formalizations of Commonsense Reasoning. Trask, R. (1993). A dictionary of grammatical terms in linguistics. London ; New York: Routledge. (page 233) Winograd, T. (1972). Understanding natural language. Cognitive Psychology, 3(1), 1-191. (page 33) Hunston, S. (2002). Corpora in Applied Linguistics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Jurafsky, D., & Martin, J. (2009). Speech and language processing: An introduction to natural language processing, computational linguistics, and speech recognition (2nd ed., Prentice Hall series in artificial intelligence). Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Pearson Prentice Hall. Gray, M. & Suri, S. (2019) Ghost work. Boston, M.A.: HMH Books.  I'm at https://tomscott.com on Twitter at https://twitter.com/tomscott on Facebook at https://facebook.com/tomscott and on Instagram as tomscottgo. February 17, 2020. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m3vIEKWrP9Q
  40.     "Can The Words You Read Change Your Behavior?" Tom Scott, Youtube. [4:36] "Priming" is the idea that the words you read can change the way you act. And yes, there are papers that show an effect: but we also need to talk about the Replication Crisis. MORE LANGUAGE FILES: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL96C35uN7xGLDEnHuhD7CTZES3KXFnwm0. December 2019. https://youtu.be/CVAlKJbQ_gE
  41.      "Why Shakespeare Could Never Have Been French." Tom Scott, Youtube. [5:01] Shakespeare sounds a certain way. Why? And why could it only work in English? • Written with Gretchen McCulloch of Lingthusiasm! Her podcast has an episode about how translators approach texts: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL96C35uN7xGLDEnHuhD7CTZES3KXFnwm0. MORE LANGUAGE FILES: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL96C35uN7xGLDEnHuhD7CTZES3KXFnwm0. March 22, 2021. https://youtu.be/dUnGvH8fUUc
  42.     "Antonin Artaud and the Theater of Cruelty: Crash Course Theater #43." Crash Course, Youtube. [11:26] I don't mean it mean, but today we're going to be cruel. It's the fun-loving Theater of Cruelty, which was pioneered by the genius Antonin Artaud in France during the inter-war period in twentieth century. The Theater of Cruelty was meant to force an audience into looking at the ridiculous illusions of their bourgeois lives. Is it entertaining? Not always. Was it hugely influential? Absolutely. January 13, 2019. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DK_vZuLYHcw
  43.     '"Waiting for Godot" Explained with Philosophy | Philosophy Tube.' Philosophy, Youtube. [8:36] Samuel Beckett’s absurdist masterpiece “Waiting for Godot” is one of the most famous pieces of 20th Century Theatre – but what are the philosophical questions it raises? How does the story of its creation tie in with Albert Camus, and the Nazi invasion of France? November 25, 2016. https://youtu.be/nsxkEs6G-9s
  44.     "Lucky's Speech." Kirk Everist, Youtube. [5:12]  From Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot, a clip of archival video.  Austin College Theatre production directed by Kathleen Campbell.  Matthew Ervin as Lucky, Paul Frederick as Pozzo, Matt Varvir and Daniel Hook as Didi and Gogo. May 14, 2012. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6WOm0TbvCdM
  45.     'Why should you read "Waiting For Godot"? - Iseult Gillespie.' TED-Ed, Youtube. [5:03] View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-should...  Two men, Estragon and Vladimir, meet by a tree at dusk to wait for someone named “Godot.” So begins a vexing cycle where the two debate when Godot will come, why they’re waiting and whether they’re even at the right tree. The play offers a simple but stirring question- what should the characters do? Iseult Gillespie shares everything you need to know to read the tragicomedy.   Lesson by Iseult Gillespie, directed by Tomás Pichardo-Espaillat. October 15, 2018. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cz5ey3RqDBI
  46.     "Coming Out As Trans - A Little Public Statement." Philosophy Tube Live, Youtube. [7:56] The text and video of this statement is free to share, quote, print, perform, adapt, remix, set to lofi music, or anything else your heart desires! If you'd like to support me and my work you can sign up at http://patreon.com/philosophytube. January 30, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FG-TrnwH4iQ
  47.     "Identity: A Trans Coming Out Story | Philosophy Tube ★." Philosophy Tube, Youtube. [37:39] SUR-PRISE! ✨👑 https://www.patreon.com/PhilosophyTube  Starring Rhys Tees as 'The Man Who Isn't There' https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCR-x...  Subscribe! http://tinyurl.com/pr99a46  Paypal.me/PhilosophyTube  Twitter: @PhilosophyTube  Email: philosophytubebusiness@gmail.com  Facebook: http://tinyurl.com/jgjek5w  realphilosophytube.tumblr.com  BIBLIOGRAPHY: Elizabeth Alexander, “Coming Out Blackened and Whole,” in American Literary History Anansi’s Library, “Frantz Fanon, Blackness, and Gender Identity” Cameron Awkward-Rich, “Thinking Black [Trans] Gender,” in American Quarterly  Talia Bettcher, “Trapped in the Wrong Theory: Rethinking Trans Oppression and Resistance,” in Signs Christine Burns (ed.), Trans Britain Kimberlé Crenshaw, “Demarginalising the Intersection of Race and Sex: A Black Feminist Critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory and Antiracist Politics” Rene Descartes, Meditations Nancy Fraser, “Social Justice in the Age of Identity Politics: Redistribution, Recognition, Participation”  Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality Kai M. Green & Marquis Bey, “Where Black Feminist Thought and Trans* Feminism Meet: A Conversation,” in Souls Eva Hayward, “More Lessons From Starfish: Prefixial Flesh and Transspeciated Selves,” in Women’s Studies Quarterly Owen Jones, “Feminist icon Judith Butler on JK Rowling, trans rights, feminism and intersectionality” John Locke, “Of Identity and Diversity,” in An Essay Concerning Human Understanding Audre Lorde, “Learning from the 60s” Audre Lorde, Zami: A New Spelling of My Name Charles Mills, Blackness Visible Mia Mulder, Transsexuals and Suffering NikkieTutorials, “I’m Coming Out” Juno Roche, Trans Power Julia Serano, Whipping Girl Sydney Shoemaker, “Persons and Their Pasts,” in American Philosophical Quarterly C. Riley Snorton, Black on Both Sides Dean Spade, Normal Life Eric Stanley, “Anti-Trans Optics: Recognition, Opacity, and the Image of Force,” in South Atlantic Quarterly G.F. Stout, Mind and Matter Christine Tayleur, “Racism and Poverty in the Transgendered Community,” in Gendertrash Sylvia Wynter, “Towards the Sociogenic Principle,” in National Identity and Sociopolitical Change  Keeanga-Yamatha Taylor (ed.), How We Get Free George Yancy, “Black Trans Feminist Thought Can Set Us Free,” in Truthout   Original Music by Nina Richards - https://www.ninarichards.co.uk/. January 30, 2021. https://youtu.be/AITRzvm0Xtg
  48. "Waiting for Godot." Samuel Beckett, audiobook narrated by Sean Barrett. Produced 2006 and purchased from Libro.fm August 13, 2021. 
  49. "Lullaby by Tim Minchin." Tim Minchin, Youtube. [4:02] Lullaby as performed on Ben Elton's Live from Planet Earth, featuring part of the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra. February 16, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ESFANzZTdYM 
  50. "Storm by Tim Minchin." Tim Minchin, Youtube. [9:49] Filmed at the Hammersmith Apollo in London in 2009. From the Ready For This? DVD. July 3, 2014. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jIWj3tI-DXg
  51. "Tim Minchin's Storm the Animated Movie." Tim Minchin, Youtube. [10:38] NOW AVAILABLE AS AN ILLUSTRATED BOOK WITH ALL NEW ART! www.timminchin.com/stormthebook  In the confines of a London dinner party, comedian Tim Minchin argues with a hippy named Storm. While Storm herself may not be converted, audiences from London to LA have been won over by Tim's wordplay and the timely message of the film in a society where science and reason are portrayed as the enemy of belief.  Written and performed by Tim Minchin @timminchin. Directed by DC Turner @dcturner. Produced by Tracy King @tkingdoll. www.stormmovie.net. April 7, 2011. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhGuXCuDb1U
  52. "Literary Terms Explained!" Tim Nance, Youtube. [3 videos, last updated May 17, 2017] https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLIlatssdqY5M4lH1VSLH3MF9EKGMenFV9
  53. "What is New Criticism?" Tim Nance, Youtube. [4:28]  Mr. Nance briefly describes New Criticism. February 25, 2015. https://youtu.be/aa0gxWjCOxQ
  54. "The Hero's Journey." Tim Nance, Youtube. [12:06] We discuss Joseph Campbell and the stages of the Hero's Journey and how to apply it to literature! November 30, 2017. https://youtu.be/tNy4ndOjJYk
        
 
 
 
 
 

[Referenced / resourced, but not read on-air]

Articles, Bibliographies, Resources & Websites

 

  1. "The View From Halfway Down (Poem)." Fandom.com, accessed June 20, 2021. The View From Halfway Down is a symbolic poem read by Secretariat in The View from Halfway Down, in Season 6. https://bojackhorseman.fandom.com/wiki/The_View_From_Halfway_Down_(Poem)
  2. "The Myth of Sisyphus." The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica, Britannica.com. The Myth of Sisyphus, philosophical essay by Albert Camus, published in French in 1942 as Le Mythe de Sisyphe. Published in the same year as Camus’s novel L’Étranger (The Stranger), The Myth of Sisyphus contains a sympathetic analysis of contemporary nihilism and touches on the nature of the absurd. Together the two works established his reputation, and they are often seen as thematically complementary. Accessed July 12, 2021. https://www.britannica.com/topic/The-Myth-of-Sisyphus
  3. "Is it worth the trouble?" Ralph Ammer, Ralphammer.com. In 1942 Albert Camus wrote a book called “The Myth of Sisyphus”. It is about the one truly important philosophical problem: Given the circumstances of our existence, shouldn’t we just kill ourselves? This is his answer: Accessed July 12, 2021. https://ralphammer.com/is-it-worth-the-trouble/
  4. "Absurdity of Existence." Ronin Winter, Medium.com. Absurdism is a philosophy that revolves on the notion of the Absurd and how one should confront against it. The Absurd refers to the conflict between the human tendency to seek inherent meaning in life and the silent answer of the universe in which a harsh truth arises that is there is no inherent meaning in life. Existence is Absurd because of the conflicting views between humans and the universe. The Absurd comes from the conflict between expectations and reality, it is born from this confrontation. February 12, 2019. https://medium.com/the-philosophers-stone/absurdity-of-existence-31ba14ceed2
  5. "The Absurd Ways of Camus." Shreemoynee Sarkar, Medium.com. In what can easily be the most legendary opening in modern literature, Camus sets the tone for the entire novel — cool and detached, in which the protagonist, Meursault, talks to the readers. Meursault is born in Algeria and he personifies what French philosopher Émile Durkheim describes as Anomie — a listless, callous, affectless condition in which the person progresses into the inability to unify himself with social norms or share his sympathies with others. April 4, 2020. https://medium.com/lotus-fruit/the-absurd-ways-of-camus-a48212320818
  6. "An Absurd Reasoning: Philosophical Suicide: The Myth of Sisyphus, Albert Camus." Absurdity derives from the comparison or juxtaposition of two incompatible ideas. For instance, we would say "that's absurd" if someone suggested that a perfectly honest and virtuous man secretly lusts for his sister. We would be juxtaposing the two incompatible ideas of the virtuous man on the one hand and the man with the incestuous lust on the other hand. The concept of the absurd as Camus has been discussing it also consists of such juxtaposition. We are faced on one hand with man, who wants to find reason and unity in the universe, and on the other hand with the universe, that provides him with nothing but mute and meaningless phenomena. As such, the absurd does not exist either in man or in the universe, but in the confrontation between the two. We are only faced with the absurd when we take both our need for answers and the world's silence together. Acessed July 5, 2021.  https://www.sparknotes.com/philosophy/sisyphus/section3/
  7. "The Absurd Courage of Choosing to Live." Jennifer Michael Hecht, Onbeing.org. Camus opens “An Absurd Reasoning,” the first essay in his collection The Myth of Sisyphus, with these words:“There is but one truly serious philosophical problem, and that is suicide. Judging whether life is or is not worth living amounts to answering the fundamental question of philosophy. All the rest — whether or not the world has three dimensions, whether the mind has nine or twelve categories — comes afterwards. These are games; one must first answer.”He makes the seriousness of the question clear by essentially threatening to think through the problem, come to an answer, and then carry out that answer, even if it means to die. With a fierce wit he judges that his subject is urgent compared with other questions of philosophy, writing, “I have never seen anyone die for the ontological argument.” September 27, 2016. https://onbeing.org/blog/the-absurd-courage-of-choosing-to-live/
  8. "Revolt, Freedom, Passion." Jon Awbrey, Inquirytoinquiry.com. "Thus I draw from the absurd three consequences, which are my revolt, my freedom, and my passion. By the mere activity of consciousness I transform into a rule of life what was an invitation to death — and I refuse suicide. I know, to be sure, the dull resonance that vibrates throughout these days. Yet I have but a word to say: that it is necessary. When Nietzsche writes: “It clearly seems that the chief thing in heaven and on earth is to obey at length and in a single direction: in the long run there results something for which it is worth the trouble of living on this earth as, for example, virtue, art, music, the dance, reason, the mind — something that transfigures, something delicate, mad, or divine,” he elucidates the rule of a really distinguished code of ethics. But he also points the way of the absurd man. Obeying the flame is both the easiest and the hardest thing to do. However, it is good for man to judge himself occasionally. He is alone in being able to do so." April 23, 2013. https://inquiryintoinquiry.com/2013/04/23/revolt-freedom-passion/
  9. "Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Albert Camus." Ronald Aronson, Edward N. Zalta (Ed.). Albert Camus (1913–1960) was a journalist, editor and editorialist, playwright and director, novelist and author of short stories, political essayist and activist—and, although he more than once denied it, a philosopher. He ignored or opposed systematic philosophy, had little faith in rationalism, asserted rather than argued many of his main ideas, presented others in metaphors, was preoccupied with immediate and personal experience, and brooded over such questions as the meaning of life in the face of death. Although he forcefully separated himself from existentialism, Camus posed one of the twentieth century’s best-known existentialist questions, which launches The Myth of Sisyphus: “There is only one really serious philosophical question, and that is suicide” (MS, 3). Summer 2017 Edition. https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/camus/
  10. "Ladder of Escape." Alma Royale, Wordpress.com. 'For the absurd man it is not a matter of explaining and solving, but of experiencing and describing. Everything begins with lucid indifference.' Albert Camus.August 13, 2015. https://ladderofescape.wordpress.com/2015/08/13/lucid-indifference/
  11. “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.” Carl Sagan, Cosmos. Accessed July 6, 2021. https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/32952-if-you-wish-to-make-an-apple-pie-from-scratch
  12. "Wubba Lubba dub-dub." Wubba Lubba Dub-Dub is Rick's catchphrase, which he recurrently uses in the show, mostly in season one. He uses this phrase every time he's happy or makes a joke. It also means “I am in great pain.” Rickandmorty.fandom.com, accessed July 12, 2021. https://rickandmorty.fandom.com/wiki/Wubba_Lubba_dub-dub
  13. "Grice's Maxims." Sas.upenn.edu, accessed August 3, 2021. https://www.sas.upenn.edu/~haroldfs/dravling/grice.html
  14. "Prosody." Merriam-webster.com. Noun; 1. the study of versification. Accessed August 3, 2021. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/prosody
  15. "The Root's Clapback Mailbag: Same Thing." Michael Harriot, Theroot.com. Each Friday, we clap back at readers' emails, DMs, tweets and messages. We do it because we care. September 10, 2021. https://www.theroot.com/the-roots-clapback-mailbag-same-thing-1847654083






 





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